Saturday, August 6, 2011

Getting Old Don't Mean You Slow Down

Last week I did the Tiburon Triathlon.

It was the 2nd triathlon I've done this season, the second triathlon I've done since ending my three year long triathlon hiatus.

My first time doing this triathlon was 5 years ago -- when I was 15 pounds lighter, and much younger both mentally & physically. I had very few expectations for myself this time around, other than to get some more race time in, and a have fun.

There's also the beer that Marin Brewing Company serves at the end of the race...but I digress....

To my surprise;

- My swim time was faster by close to two minutes;

- My bike time was several minutes faster -- but some of that is explainable by a mechanical failure back in 2006, and a different course this year.

- My run time was (to my great surprise), much faster. I ran a sub-8 minute mile for those two miles. Five years ago (and 15 pounds back) I ran a slower time on the same course.

The swim is explainable by a combination of a newer wetsuit and being a much better swimmer. Better doesn't mean better cardio or upper body strength -- it means smoother in the water.

The run -- this is where it gets funky. I was dead tired after the bike section. The whole first mile of the 2 mile course I had chest pains. Also -- because my legs were trashed from the bike portion -- I couldn't do a long stride. So I ran with a lot of short steps, often mid-foot striking.

While I don't support (anymore) barefoot running or the usage of barefoot running shoes like the VFF, there is no getting around the fact that fore and midfoot striking is (in certain contexts) a faster way to run. The results from last week bore that out.

The key is to find the right training methodology to make forefoot/midfoot running safe. This isn't about shoes -- its about drills, training routines, and contexts.

Lastly, like Randy Couture, Deana Torres, and George Foreman, it really is possible to still perform at the top of your game as you get older. The key is to find ways to improve your game as time goes by.

Sunday, June 12, 2011

The Riddle of Steel....

The other day I was at Box Dog Bikes doing a stem-ectomy on my 1990's Kestrel. Box Dog gets a lot of the people just randomly stopping in to pump their tires, do minor maintenance, or just shoot the sh*& with the staff. Its a bike shop for people who really love bikes.

I struck up a conversation with an ex-bike mechanic riding on a 1980's Trek road bike. The thing had been through Hell. You could tell my the nasty dents on its frame. Twenty + years of hard riding had taken its toll. But it was still running well. The ex-bike mechanic had done his share of work to maintain its moving parts. We discussed the beauty of older bicycles, the fact his battle shattered Trek was still running, and the fact my well preserved Kestrel SC200 would snap in two if I sneezed at it the wrong way.

Thus we come to the discussion of the Riddle of Steel.

Going around SF every day, you come across tons of vintage steel bicycles. Many have been converted into fixies or single speeds. Some are still in something close to the same condition they were 20+ years ago -- with the same Campy and Shimano components that were originally installed on them. No STI shifters for these guys.

Vintage carbon -- a little.

Vintage aluminum -- some -- lot of Cannondale 3.0 series frames out there.

But at the end of the day -- it's all about double and triple butted Cro-Mo. The city is covered by old steel frames that have been through accidents, theft, and horrible owners. Dents, bad attempts to spread out the rear triangle. You name it. But the frames still function. Something you can't really say about an aluminum or carbon fiber frame of equal age.

These days it is VERY rare to come across a steel frame for less than a $1000. Even above $1000 there aren't that many options. Sure, modern science has given us some wonderful aluminum alloys, thinner and stronger carbon fiber, bargain basement titanium, mixtures of all of the above.

But bang for the buck -- in terms of reliability, longevity, and resilience, it still steel.

The cycling industry -- Evil Empire that it is -- will argue otherwise.

Screw them -- that's why we have Craigslist.

So for those out there who like myself are struggling to balance off their expensive endurance sport hobby with a pocketbook that doesn't get much bigger every year, take heart. Find that beautiful hunk of handcrafted lugged steel Italian masterwork from the era of High Hair and Parachute Pants. Spend the extra $100-200 to clean her up and get her running again --- and ignore those Shmucks at the local bike shop that tell you otherwise. It'll be cheaper, faster, and more reliable, than almost anything you buy brand new.

And you won't regret it.

Monday, June 6, 2011

Guy Values, Girl Values, Asian Yuppie Values...

A few weekends back I had another run in with a local resident -- an angry 300 lb Black Man who likes to call me a Fucking Gook every time I passed him in the street. The first time was in evening when I went to Walgreens to load up on diapers. The second time was when I was walking home on a Sunday morning from a swimming class. Same deal, I'm focused on something else, then I hear, "FUCKING GOOK!" I turn around and I see the guy's back towards me walking away -- all 300 Lbs of him listening to something in black earbuds.

Whenever these things have happened, I've run into the usual thing -- anger and a thought maybe I should wack this guy. Then there is the reality that he's 300 lbs, and probably at least a little crazy. Not someone you get into fights with.

When I've discussed this with other Guys I've noticed that the Guys are less than sympathetic. The attitude I get is that I should have either done something, or kept my mouth shut about the whole thing. The fact I didn't challenge him means I'm a wimp --- the issue of him being a 300 lb Black Man with a lot more pent up anger being a non-issue.

When I discuss this with my wife and the Girls, I get the attitude I should just ignore all this. The line there is that he's a hater, a junky, and an idiot. And I should be "better" than this.

Ironically -- the local Krav Maga school I work out at it once posted on their website to NEVER get into a fight on the street due to a stupid provocation like this. Their shtick, is that the guy doing the provoking has got something up their sleeve, so don't fall for it.

Then there are the value systems I was raised with --- which I hate, but I can't escape. The few times as a child I got into fights, and got into trouble for them, my family members (my parents, older brother & sister) would come down on me with a shtick that was;

- You lost your fight -- so you are an idiot for fighting;
- Fighting is a low class thing -- and we are NOT low class people;

The lesson from family members in this -- irrespective of the context or whether or not I was justified -- unless I know I can win, I should not be fighting anyone.

So, unless I had kicked the shit out of that Angry 300 Lb Black Man (a big if), my wife and family members would view me as an idiot. my friends who are female -- they'd probably think the same thing as my wife and family members. And the dudes --- even as they dismiss me for being a Wimp for not sticking up for myself, I'd still get shit for starting a fight with someone a lot bigger & tougher then me.

Which leaves me with nothing but this blog, where I vent about things I can't change.